Blogs / Events / Articles / News

Unpaid Internships: Avoid a FLSA Faux Pas

A sampling of Obermayer's HR Legalist Blog's recent post on unpaid internships can be read here. With the excitement of New York Fashion Week coming to a close, there is one recent trend that the fashion industry should pay particular attention to—unpaid internship lawsuits.  The fashion industry is now among a recent slew of industries...

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Government Shutdown: How Does It Affect Your Pending Labor and Employment Matters?

A stalemate in Congress has caused the federal government to shutdown as of October 1, 2013.  As a result, various federal agencies that enforce labor and employment laws are shutdown or operating in a very limited capacity.  For many, the shutdown and its attendant effects will include such things as the tolling of filing deadlines, cancellation of mediations and hearings, and delays in the processing of FOIA requests.  Federal agencies have posted contingency plans for operations during the shutdown on their respective websites.  Below are the main highlights for each agency.

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New Jersey Requires Leave for Victims of Domestic Violence or Sexual Assault

Beginning on October 1, 2013, the New Jersey Security and Financial Employment Act (“NJ SAFE Act”) will require public and private employers in New Jersey with 25 or more employees to provide up to 20 days of unpaid leave, within a 12 month period, to an employee who is the victim of domestic violence or sexual assault.  The unpaid...

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Take Your Best Shot: It's Time to “Stump the Lawyers” in our Labor Relations and Employment Law Department

On Wednesday, September 25, 2013, Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel LLP’s Labor Relations and Employment Law Department will host its popular “Stump the Lawyers” breakfast program. We invite you to attend and bring your workplace issues and questions to see if we can help you resolve them. Test our partners and associates wit...

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Michael Pepperman and Ivo Becica mentioned in the Daily Labor Report

Michael Pepperman, Tom Hearn and Ivo Becica obtained a temporary restraining order for their client, SCI, a funeral home management company, against union picketers after labor contract negotiations broke down. The failed negotiations, which centered around disagreements on pensions and other benefits, led to a strike of 59 funeral directors a...

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Criminal Background Checks Result in EEOC Lawsuits Against Prominent National Employers

Last year, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") took significant measures to curb employer use of criminal background checks in hiring decisions by issuing new restrictive guidelines for employers.  The EEOC’s guidelines can be accessed at the following link: http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/guidance/arrest_conviction.cfm.  ...

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WHITE HOUSE DELAYS AFFORDABLE CARE ACT’S EMPLOYER MANDATE UNTIL 2015

The White House has decided to delay implementation of the Employer Mandate provision, a key component of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the “ACA”) until 2015. The Employer Mandate provision, which was slated to become effective January 1, 2014, requires employers with 50 or more employees to offer coverage to employees...

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Notice Provisions of Affordable Care Act to Become Effective in October 2013, Department of Labor Issues Model Notices

On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2012 (“PPACA”) into law. The PPACA created a Health Insurance Marketplace (commonly referred to as an “Exchange”), in which consumers are given the opportunity to choose amongst a range of option to purchase health insurance coverage....

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THE SUPREME COURT DEFINES “SUPERVISOR”

Consider this:  You are sued by one of your employees who alleges that another employee has discriminatorily harassed her.  Will you be liable for the sins of the alleged harasser?  How that case will proceed against you largely depends on whether the alleged harasser is a supervisor.  However, until the U.S. Supreme Court&rsquo...

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The Supreme Court Sets the Standard for Proving a Retaliation Claim

Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex and national origin and also prohibits retaliation against an employee who opposes such discrimination or who participates in Title VII proceedings (generally called “protected activity”).  In University of Texas v....

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